California Dreaming

Posted in motorcycle, outdoors, Photography, Travel with tags , , , , on September 20, 2014 by thecaptainnemo

California Dreams

California Dreams

Well schools back in full swing so between class, work and homework I’m keeping pretty busy. Before the semester started though I managed yet another trip to the coast to escape the heat and hang out at the beach for awhile. It was lovely riding the motorcycle with a cool breeze for a change.

surfs up

surfs up

Pismo

Pismo

Beach

Beach

 

I spotted this neat old bike in a window when I stopped to grab something to eat.

Thor

Thor

Beautiful Sunset

Beautiful Sunset

 

Woof

Woof

A great day at the beach.

Surfer at the Beach sunset

Beach sunset

 

What excitement?

Posted in Uncategorized on August 30, 2014 by thecaptainnemo

thecaptainnemo:

I’ve started a new blog to repost some of my old cartoons (and maybe some new ones) about working offshore as a commercial diver:

Originally posted on The Depth Defying Adventures of Captain Nemo:

TheDepthDefyingAdventuresofCaptNemo

View original

Good to be underground again

Posted in Caving, motorcycle, outdoors, Photography, reptiles, Travel, Uncategorized, wildlife with tags , , , , , , on August 22, 2014 by thecaptainnemo

Leigh in the Cave

Leigh in the Cave

Not so windy weekend wandering around wonderful winding passages.

This cave has long been  high on my list of places I wanted to visit but somehow my schedule never coincided with a trip. This year I was happy to see that the trip would take place during summer break when I would be able to go.

I was also excited as I haven’t had an opportunity to go caving as much as I’d like since moving down to Bakersfield. It was a bit of a ride on my motorcycle to the meeting spot in Columbia but I made it easy by spending the night in Ceres so it was just a short ride in the morning. There I was happy to see Kip pull up as I always enjoy going caving with him. right behind him pulled in Ben and Leigh who I had previously caved with at Millerton and our fearless leader Martin.

 

Martin poses beneath some formations

Martin poses beneath some formations

We all climbed into two vehicles for the drive up to the cave. After a short hike we reached the cave. Martin gave us a rundown on the history of the cave. It was interesting to hear it had been re-opened as recently as the 70’s then sealed closed and re-opened again in the late 90’s. Hopefully the current restrictions on visitation will continue to keep the cave in it’s beautiful condition. Speaking of which I had a horrible time deciding where to take pictures as there was enough formations and decorated passageways to keep me busy for a day or two but Martin had said we would be spending 6 or seven hours in the cave and had a couple of projects to complete while there.  Once we had the gate open I rigged the rope while Martin got the supplies ready for these projects. Kip climbed down to open the lower gate and we were ready to go caving.  Right near the bottom of the drop Ben and Kip spotted a newt (probably Taricha torosa sierrae – Sierra Newt

Correction thanks to inaturalist.org I now know it was a Ensatina (Ensatina eschscholtzii) both are salmanders but then newts and ensatinas branch from there.

Not a newt- Ensatina (Ensatina eschscholtzii)

Not a newt- Ensatina (Ensatina eschscholtzii)

 

I took a couple of pictures then shooed him off to the side of the passage so we would be sure not to step on him upon our return. The next main room we entered had lots of nice stalactites and soda straws so I happily set about taking pictures. Martin had brought along string and flags which we used to mark some of the more sensitive areas of the cave so hopefully future trips will not disturb them.  We continued to the area of the cave where the lions tales formations are located and I was excited to photograph them. Of course my flashes promptly ceased to function. After a few minutes of fiddling with them I discovered that the batteries in one had leaked, possibly due to overheating on the motorcycle trip up. A quick change of batteries and they still weren’t working. I was puzzled till Martin suggested checking the settings and sure enough during the battery change a flash had switched to an auto mode instead of manual. Yeah I was back in business. I finished taking a couple pictures of the lions tails and then carefully proceeded to a sensitive area where we took off our helmets in order to protect the fragile formations. Returning to the main junction we had a break for lunch then I opted to stick around and take pictures of helectites while the others checked out the rest of the cave. On the way out we stopped and Martin had a final project to complete- the lower ladder had become a little shaky as its bottom support had cracked. He successfully drilled a hole in the ladder and support then connected them securely with a bolt.

Lions tail

Lions tail

Kip admiring stalactites

Kip admiring stalactites

helectites

helectites

After exiting the cave, securing the gate and returning to Colombia we realized it was too late too make it to the restaurant for dinner and as both Martin and I had lengthy drives ahead of us we all loaded up in our respective vehicles and headed for home. Another great trip  in the Motherlode.

Arriving at Columbia on my Motorcycle

Arriving at Columbia on my Motorcycle

 

Southern China(town)

Posted in motorcycle, Photography, Travel with tags , , , , , , , on August 17, 2014 by thecaptainnemo

It's a dogs life

It’s a dogs life

Reading this post http://waterfallsandcaribous.com/2014/06/02/a-north-point-tour-of-hong-kong-eating-styles-roast-meat-edition/ reminded me how much I missed going to China Town In San  Francisco when I lived in Sacramento and the wonderful roast duck. A little thought on the matter made me realize it would only be a couple of hours ride on the motorcycle and I could be in Southern California’s China town next to downtown L.A and surely I’d fine delicious roast duck there. Besides it was miserably hot in Bakersfield and the coast promised to be at least a couple of degrees cooler. First I had to suffer through the heat of the valley and a horrible amount of dust in the air, but once I crossed the grapevine it was notably cooler which felt wonderful as I drove through L.A on my motorcycle. I wasn’t in a rush so I drove around the long way returning back through the garment district to finally arrive at my destination. I was pretty sure I was in the right nieghborhood when I parked across the street from this building.

Los Angeles China Town

Los Angeles China Town

I was not to be disappointed either as there were several shops with delicious bbq, noodles and dim sum, the biggest problem was choosing one.

While I wondered around and pondered my choices I had plenty of time to admire the crosswalks

China Town Crosswalk

China Town Crosswalk

and spotted some neat art on a building

Street art, LA China Town

Street art, LA China Town

and to wonder about this sign?

New High herbs Tea and imaging

New High herbs Tea and imaging

I figured out its on ‘New high street’ but does the tea make you see images or???

Someone seemed to have a warning for bears and rabbits to stay away!

bear, La China Town

bear, La China Town

Rabbit, LA China Town

Rabbit, LA China Town

This place claimed superior chicken but I was in search of roast duck so the search continues

Superior Chicken

Superior Chicken

LA, China town, in case there was any doubt I was in the wrong neighborhood

LA, China town, in case there was any doubt I was in the wrong neighborhood

Ah ha surely a place that goes by the name Hong Kong BBQ was what I was looking for.

Hong Kong BBQ

Hong Kong BBQ

and success, mMMmmm delicious.

Roast duck

Roast duck

While I’m not a huge fan of the tea eggs the baby bok choy was a delicious accompaniment.

I had a nice ride home which made for a very satisfying day out and away from the valley heat.

LA China Town

LA China Town

 

Continuing in Africa

Posted in Caving, family, outdoors, Photography, reptiles, Travel, Uncategorized, wildlife with tags , , , , , , , on August 14, 2014 by thecaptainnemo

The Three Dikgosi Monument

The Three Dikgosi Monument the three Chiefs monument Khama III of the Bangwato, Sebele I of the Bakwena, and Bathoen I of the Bangwaketse.

Continuing my reminiscing from 2006 here’s part 2…

While I was sad to see most of the group departing I was glad my visit with my Parents in Botswana wasn’t over yet. Rolf was able to stay a few days longer and had expressed an interest in seeing some more animals so we headed out to the nearby Gaborone game preserve.  While not as lavish as our trip to Mokolodi with its wonderful restaurant the Gaborone game preserve   did allow us some wonderful animal watching especially the vervet Monkeys that made me laugh at their antics. I was especially excited to spot a monitor lizard by the side of the road as I have plenty of childhood memories of looking for these in Malawi. – I still remember my friends little sister screaming when one approached her in the water. We laughed since we had told her not to take our little boat out and she had anyway, but in all fairness it was a big monitor (over six foot) and she could have been seriously injured so we should have been more worried. We also visited the Botanical gardens again and went to see the Three Dikgosi Monument (three Chiefs monument).

Vervet Monkey

Vervet Monkey

 

Monitor Lizard

Monitor Lizard

warthog

warthog

This way to the caves

This way to the caves

After Rolf finally had to leave we were considering various things to do when I mentioned I had seen an advertisement for a cave near Sterkfontein, in South Africa, was that close enough for a visit. My parents said that wouldn’t be a problem but since it was a bit of a drive and we wanted to avoid driving home late at night we’d just plan on spending the night. As it turned out a visit to Sterkfontein was an awesome idea as it is a world heritage site due to it being the location where some of the earliest hominoid remains have been found. Hence its other name “the cradle of Mankind”.

They had a very nice museum on site so we got a chance to browse the exhibits while we waited to tour the cave.

Museum display

Museum display

 

Sterkfontein cave

Sterkfontein cave

Now most of the interest here was in the archeology and history the cave itself is not a particularly decorated one though it did have a few stalactites and stalagmites. Luckily though the nearby “wonder cave” has that all covered. My parents had had enough of stairs climbing in and out of Sterkfontein but since wonder cave boasted access via elevator they happily came along. The brochure forgot to mention the two hundred or so steps you have to climb to reach the elevator.

 

Wonder cave

Wonder cave

This cave was also well worth a visit for despite previous limestone miners having removed a lot of formations from the cave there were still tons of beautiful formations. It also happens to be at the site of the lion and Rhino preserve a private game reserve so after spending the night at the nearby Big five lodge. We returned to check out the animals.

Inquisitive Ostrich

Inquisitive Ostrich

I think this ostrich wanted me to roll down the window so he could see if we had any food in the car. I wasn’t obliging.

While we did see the rhino’s they managed to keep their distance in the tall grass so I didn’t get any good pictures, the lions and some crested cranes were much more cooperative.

crested crane

crested crane

lioness

lioness

Oh and Zebras lots of zebras!

zebra

zebra

Guinea fowl

Guinea fowl

 

All to soon it was time to begin the long drive back to Botswana but we had one more treat in store for us a lovely rainbow!

rainbow

rainbow

 

 

 

African Dreams

Posted in Caving, family, outdoors, Photography, Travel, Uncategorized, wildlife with tags , , , , , , , , on July 28, 2014 by thecaptainnemo

African corn cricket

African corn cricket

                            Browsing through my WordPress posts I realized they begin after some of my favorite adventures. so today I’m taking a trip down memory lane to 2006 and an expedition to visit caves in Botswana.

The drought is over Gabarone, Botswana 2006

The drought is over Gaborone, Botswana 2006

The Drought In Botswana Is Over”

I departed Sacramento greatly excited, over two years of planning and I was finally on my way. The flights went just as planned but when I arrived in Johannesburg I ran into a small problem. My luggage wasn’t checked through to Botswana so I had to go through customs to claim my checked bags. After doing so I could not re-enter the international lounge in order to get to the hotel so I spent an uncomfortable night camped in the arrivals lounge. The next day I caught my flight to Gaborone with no problems though and arrived in Botswana where my Parents were waiting for me. In the rain! Despite My Dad’s previous assurances that Botswana’s drought made it very unlikely we would experience rain this was just the beginning and I was in store for more rain then I ever wanted to see. The rest of my group weren’t due in yet so we went out for lunch and saw a movie, ‘Momma Jack’, a South African comedy by Leon Schuster.

 The next day we headed out to the airport to greet the next arrivals but there was no one on the plane I recognized! We waited for the next flight arriving from South Africa and fortunately Tom, Karole, Doug and Ric were on it. Their luggage wasn’t though. We went and ate lunch as the next flight didn’t arrive till after 3:00pm. When it arrived Rolf, Bil and Perri were on board and so was all the luggage!

Loading up the landrover at the airport

Loading up the landrover at the airport

We spent the next two days meeting with people from the Botswana National Museum and shopping for supplies. We found out that due to some bad timing and political matters the museum would not be involved in our caving project at the Lobatse caves but we did have an introduction to the property owner. ( The caves are on a private cattle estate.)

Rolf fooling around at the national museum. I'm pretty sure he's in no danger, can't say the same for the sculpture!

Rolf fooling around at the national museum. I’m pretty sure he’s in no danger, can’t say the same for the sculpture!

         Finally on Wednesday February 8th we were on our way to the Lobatse estates to see some caves. We got a late start though after deciding to get a trailer to help fit all our gear and trying to load everything in between the thunder showers. It was nearly closing time for the estate when we arrived at the gate but they were expecting us so we had no problem at the gate. Getting to the estate office proved to be a challenge though as there was a newly flooded river across the road. My parents car would never make it across but their landrover with Bill at the wheel had no problem crossing.

River crossing

River crossing

 

A couple of trips saw us all across the river and checking in at the office. We were shown the location of Lobatse cave #1 which was about 4 kilometers from the office on a dirt track. After agreeing to meet my parents back across the river on Sunday morning we headed out to the area near the cave. As it was getting dark rapidly we all set about setting up tents and no sooner had we finished then it began to rain again. We ate huddled in a large tent then went to bed. It proceeded to storm throughout most of the night with booming thunder waking us occasionally. It continued till after 4 in the morning.

Camp at the Lobatse Estate

Camp at the Lobatse Estate

The next day in spite of little sleep the excitement of seeing a new cave got me up early and as soon as we’d had some breakfast Doug and I rigged the drop into Lobatse cave #1, We were all very glad the rain had stopped. It was during all this that Doug announced the trip report should be entitled ‘the drought is over’ to which we all heartily agreed. Karole rigged up first to climb down into the cave and as she began her descent a beautiful white owl, possibly a barn owl flew out of the entrance. Bill, Ric and I followed her down. I was amazed to see the root structure of the fig trees at the entrance formed a column that extended all the way down the entrance shaft and into the talus cone at the bottom.

Tom descends into Lobatse cave #1

Tom descends into Lobatse cave #1

The drop was approximately 18.5 meters. The talus cone contained several bones near the surface including some large horse like jaw bones and certainly future excavation properly carried out may reveal some interesting finds. There were also several small frogs and a small toad perched on the rocks on this pile. When Tom and Rolf had joined us at the bottom Rolf began eagerly collecting several of the flat, grayish cockroaches that crawled about on the cave floor. We continued into the cave and passed a section of chicken wire mesh fencing lying mostly on the ground though there was evidence that it had been put in place in the cave as in a couple of places the sticks used as fence posts were still in place. We found out later back at the Museum that the fence had originally been put in the cave by South African freedom fighters hiding in the cave during apartheid. We saw a lot of bats in the cave, I have posted pics of some of them on Inaturalist.org and have received possible identifications as  

Square Horseshoe bats Genus Rhinolophus and Square Egyptian slit-faced bat Nycteris thebaica

We also noticed that the number of bats appears to have increased greatly from the 500 or so reported previously. I would estimate they now number closer to several thousand. This and the large amount of corresponding guano may explain why shortly after we took a look around and observed the bats, Karole who had climbed up a ledge into a further part of the cave reported that the air was bad. We all retreated back to the entrance and posed for a few pictures as we enjoyed the fresh air there. I decided to check out the passage in the opposite direction away from the bats. I went down the talus slope and the passage quickly narrowed to a small squeeze. I slid through it easily enough but upon reaching the small room on the other side I immediately noticed I was breathing far too rapidly. I tried the bic lighter test and found the lighter would not even light in this space! I hastily retreated back to the squeeze where Bill took some pictures of me trying the lighter test and clearly showing a heavy layer of CO2. We all agreed that further exploration and survey in this cave was not a prudent move and so we planned to try and locate Lobatse cave #2 to see if there were more survey to be done there. Peri and I stayed to watch the camp as the others went on a hike to try and locate the second cave. Everyone returned around dinner time but they had not managed to locate the second cave.

Testing for bad air -Photo by Bill Frantz

Testing for bad air -Photo by Bill Frantz

The next day Bill and I drove back to the office to ask for help locating other caves on the estate. After a little inquiry we were told two estate security guards that were in the area of our camp would help us so Bill and I headed back to camp. We arrived back to find they had already arrived and were leading several of our group to some sink holes that were nearby to Lobatse cave #1. On their return to the camp I asked about other caves on the estate and they agreed to ride in the landrover and show us some. We first drove about 5km to a hill that had 2 very small rock shelter type caves, one of which did have a pool of water in it that was rumored to be home to a large snake. Then we tried to drive on to where a larger cave (possibly Lobatse cave #2) was. On the way we saw Impala and Kudu as well as numerous birds. Before we reached the hill where the cave was though the ground became increasingly marshy and the landrover was stuck. After some shoving and some well placed logs our two guides and I managed to provide enough traction for Bill to back up and we attempted to drive around to the other side of the estate where there was a hill with yet another cave. We ran into more marshy ground but this time instead of risking getting stuck Bill backed the land rover to firmer ground and we proceeded on foot.

Temporarily stuck landrover- the ground here was very wet.

Temporarily stuck landrover- the ground here was very wet.

We walked about 3 kilometers to the hill and climbed up to an outcrop where we found an opening. I crawled in past two turns and could see the passage continuing through a squeeze ahead. There was definite airflow coming out of the cave and a bat flew past my head. Indicating that this may be a sizable cave. By this time a troop of baboons further along the ridge were becoming increasingly agitated and hooting at us so we decided to head back down the hill before they got any closer. We returned to camp and while some of us started to prepare dinner Bill and Doug gave our guides a ride back to the office. It wound up though that they had to give them a ride all the way into the town of Lobatse. They became the Hero’s of the day when they returned to camp with cold drinks for everyone!

Doug aka the wilderness chef hard at work cooking up moth stew.

Doug aka the wilderness chef hard at work cooking up moth stew.

That evening we sat up by the cave entrance and watched the bats fly out and a magnificent sunset.

Sunset while we waited for the bats

Sunset while we waited for the bats

                            Saturday we eagerly headed to the nearby row of sinkholes. We began by marking some of the entrances locations with our gps and then proceeded to what appeared to be the largest of these. The pit was only a little over two meters deep with a large rock and two trees in it. We rigged up a rope and Rolf climbed down in. He quickly warned us to watch out for wasps. There were numerous wasps nests all around the overhang of the entrance. They were primarily paper wasps but a couple of different types of mud daubers had also made nests there. We proceeded to survey the cave which had a couple of small off shoots that even contained some draperies and rim stone. We also noted several bones in the talus pile at the pit and some pots we found towards the back of the main area of the cave. And of course Rolf filled several vials with more beetles and cockroaches. We also saw a small 6cm long snake and a couple of small frogs in this cave. We decided to name this cave the local name for the paper wasps which were so prevalent. My Dad checked on the name for these in Setswana when we returned to Gaborone, and the name for the cave is now Mohu(wasp) cave. On the way back to camp Bill, Ric, Doug and I stopped at one of the promising looking sink holes that went back under a large tree root. It turned out to be a slot type cave which Bill and Ric climbed down to the bottom of. It was about ten meters deep and thirty meters long. Ric also poked into a small sinkhole but it didn’t go much further back then a meter or two. We returned to camp and started preparing to pack up to head back to Gaborone the next day.

Why are we calling this wasp cave again?

Why are we calling this wasp cave again?

Bill sketching in Mohu cave

Bill sketching in Mohu cave

Ric checking possible leads in Mohu Cave

Ric checking possible leads in Mohu Cave

Dinner time at camp Lobatse

Dinner time at camp Lobatse

The following day we Loaded up the landrover and walked back to the office while Bill drove the landrover and then ferried us all across the river to where my parents were waiting. On the way back to Gaborone we saw a troop of baboons crossing the road in the rain.

Baboons playing in traffic

Baboons playing in traffic

We had dinner in Gaborone at ‘Something Fishy’, a fish and chips shop and began planning for our trip north Peri suggested and we all agreed that the car and trailer did not provide enough room for all ten of us and our gear so we would be renting another 4wd vehicle for the trip to Gcwihaba cave.

 

Shopping at the mall

Shopping at the mall

After our wet week at Lobatse we had plenty of muddy clothes so before heading out of town a trip to Kofifi Laundry was certainly in order. We wound up using almost all the washer / dryers in the place and the ladies that worked in the back had to go get us more change for the machines.

Laundry at kofifi, waiting for the clothes to dry.

Laundry at kofifi, waiting for the clothes to dry.

   On Monday we had a busy day lined up including meeting with the museum director and a long list of errand to prepare for the trip north. Doug & Bill figured out how to use the high lift jack to change a tire and things were only complicated by the fact that the landrovers water pump had developed a pretty bad leak. We managed to get most of our various errands run though, get the landrover to the shop, meet with the Museum director and then pick up both the landrover and the rented Toyota hilux. We all enjoyed dinner at Nando’s with their legendary ‘Peri Peri’ sauce. For those who haven’t tried peri-peri it’s a spicy sauce of portugeuse/ Mozambique origin and there’s a chain of Nando’s all over southern Africa that serves delicious chicken cooked in this.

Tuesday we began our drive around the country by heading off to see the ‘great grey-green, greasy Limpopo River, all set about with fever-trees, to find out what the Crocodile has for dinner. ’ , despite my Dad’s objection that it was just a river and out of the way. We tried to reach the closest crossing to our route north which was Buffels drift but found the track blocked by a new private game reserve, so instead we continued onto the village of Dovedale and eventually to Parrs halt where the boarder guards graciously let us walk across to view the river. We didn’t stay long though as it was continuing to rain the whole time we were there and soon we were back on the main road heading towards Francistown. I was driving the landrover and We had passed the town of Mahalapye by about 20km when the Toyota passed us rapidly. Turned out they were trying to warn us of a bulge in our tyre but they were too late. Just as they passed us there was a loud pop and the tyre blew. I was able to pull the landrover off the road before stopping but there wasn’t much room on the shoulder. Doug set to work with his expertise of the hi-lift jack and started to raise the truck. At that moment a torrential downpour hit. It was raining so hard we could barely move but Doug bravely struggled on with the jack, Ric and I pushed the spare into place and just as the rain subsided we were ready to get back on the road! Like they say I guess timing really is everything. The tyre we removed was shredded and we knew we would need to replace it before going further so we drove back to Mahalapye and ate dinner. We located a tyre shop and were told it would open in the morning so we drove to the Gaetsho lodge just outside of town and rented chalets for the night. Mom and Dad even performed a song “Baby it’s cold outside” at the bar for us.

 

site seeing at the bridge across the Limpopo.

site seeing at the bridge across the Limpopo.

 

The great green greasy Limpopo all set about with fever tree's!

The great green greasy Limpopo all set about with fever tree’s!

Wednesday began with a quick trip to the tyre shop and breakfast and before breakfast was done we had a new tyre and were ready to be on our way. We made it to Francis town for lunch where we saw a fantastic collection of emperor moths. We arrived at the great pans shortly before dark and decided to camp at the Nata sanctuary despite warnings that there were mosquitoes. We attempted to drive out to the flat grassland of the pans to see if any animals were about but the ground was very marshy so Mom decided to turn back with the landrover. Peri thought maybe the ground would be drier further on and attempted to drive a little further. This led to our first experience with the winch on the landrover. After several tries we finally got it hooked up and managed to haul the toyota out of the mud and back both vehicle carefully to dry ground. What made this particularly humorous was some South Africans exiting the park had commented that they thought the Toyota would be fine but didn’t recommend we drive into the park in the landrover.

Landrover coming to rescue the toyota

Landrover coming to rescue the toyota

Back at camp Ric was the hero of the day as he had brought a wisk broom to keep down the sand in our tents. That night we had hordes of mosquitoes so the warning was well deserved. Despite this Tom Inderkum entertained us with a plastic didgeridoo and we sang songs such as “You picked a fine time to leave us, loose wheel”, “Knee deep” and “One ton of Guano”. I’m sure stranger sounds have never echoed across the African savanna.

Donkey cart along the way

Donkey cart along the way

            Next morning we drove west to Gweta and stopped to see the giant Aardvark This giant monument was featured on the tv show ‘amazing race’ and is in fact a signpost for Planet Baobab which claims to be ‘The Kalahari Surf Club”. Normally I would guess this to be a joke but since the road to their lodge was completely covered in water who knows?

Mom and Dad by the Giant Aardvark.

Mom and Dad by the Giant Aardvark.

Our first siting of Ostrich.

Our first siting of Ostrich.

We continued west and saw ostriches ,storks and lots of other birds on the way to Maun. There we checked into the Island Safari Lodge. The road to the lodge was an adventure in itself with large puddles the size of small ponds to be forded. We stayed two nights and the some of us visited the local game reserve. We watched a large tortoise near the entrance then braved the ants that covered the trail(and bit mercilessly at my sandal-ed feet) Bill and Peri even managed to spot a giraffe, The second day we were taken on Mokoro (dugouts) up into the Okavango. Here we saw a few birds, and more reeds, marsh grass and waterlily s then one could hardly imagine. We wound along a narrow channel in the reeds for over two hours before reaching an island where we could get off and eat lunch. Our guide, Cisco led us on a walk through the bush we saw only spore and footprints of elephants and hippos as all the animals had left to seek shelter from the noonday sun. We walked on though to see a baobab tree, more birds, a sausage tree( the best mokoro are made from sausage trees) and even a fleeting glimpse of a water buck before returning to our canoes for the ride back to the island safari lodge.

 

Okavango delta waterlilies.

Okavango delta waterlilies.

Baobob tree, Okavongo delta

Baobob tree, Okavongo delta

 

On Saturday the 18th we set off to Gcwihaba cave. The dirt road in was covered with spectacular numbers of butterflies, mostly yellow. Unfortunately, the road became wetter and wetter with larger and larger fords or areas where vehicles were forcing there way through the bush to avoid getting stuck. The Toyota didn’t make it through one of these pools but we had our winching technique perfected and quickly pulled it out. The going over all was very slow though and as it got dark and it got harder to see in the rain I could see we wouldn’t be reaching the cave that night. We stopped just north of the Aha Hills. We camped on the spot and were inundated with thousands of moths. Next morning we found one of the Land Rover wheels was soft and so, due to this, the fact that we weren’t sure of exactly how much fuel was left in the landrover and the overall road conditions, we turned back. We were all very disappointed not to reach the cave but agreed it was the wisest decision. On the way back we stopped at a small remote village when a young woman held out souvenirs for sale.

butterflies all over the road, and huge ants!

butterflies all over the road, and huge ants!

Tom says hi to the kids while we buy some souvenirs.

Tom says hi to the kids while we buy some souvenirs.

We managed to get to Sehithwa on the paved road but no tire repair was found. We also found our spare tire was going soft! Unsure where to stop for the night as there was no campground or lodge nearby my Mother suggested going to the police station. The Police allowed us to camp in their yard and even use the bathroom in one of their disused jail cells. We were inundated with hoards of spiky plant bugs. Early the next morning the Land Rover was left jacked up and Bill and Doug left with the wheels in the Toyota heading back to Maun. They made great time and arrived back just as we were taking advantage of the mornings sunshine to dry out our camping gear and repack the landrover. On the way out of town we passed a huge flock of egrets. We still managed to get to Ghanzi early enough to do souvenir shopping and enjoy the Kalahari Arms chalets. That night Rolf collected several of the large elephant dung beetles that were running around. On the way back to Gaborone we saw huge groups of yellow-billed kites and marabou storks, probably enjoying the excess insects.

camped out in the police courtyard

camped out in the police courtyard

the next morning, waiting for the tire to be repaired

the next morning, waiting for the tire to be repaired

 

Egrets taking flight

Egrets taking flight

Mariboo storks

Mariboo storks

On our return Peri had already created a power point presentation of our preliminary findings in Lobatse and with a little input from Rolf and myself we had a presentation which we gave at the National museum the next day. The lecture was fairly well attended and people seemed genuinely interested in the caves.

 

We also arranged a game drive that afternoon at the nearby Mokolodi game reserve. A wonderful place that was formed in 1991 with the aim of promoting wildlife conservation and environmental education for the children of Botswana. Which means that trips that tourists like us pay for help to pay for school children to come and learn about the wildlife. Our guide did a great job finding all manners of critters including naturally-occurring animal species such as warthogs, steenbok, kudu as well as the re-introduced zebra, giraffe, eland, ostrich, and hippos. Which shows he had a good knowledge of the parks 30 square km. We didn’t see the cheetahs but they probably saw us through the tall grass and the rhinos were off somewhere we never reached. The dinner at the Mokolodi restaurant that night was superb. Our waiter had a ready smile and after crocodile scampi, and Kudu medallions I felt like we were dining royally.

 

Back in traffic in Gaborone at least it's not raining for the moment.

Back in traffic in Gaborone, at least it’s not raining for the moment.

Elephant at Mokolodi

Elephant at Mokolodi

The following day we did some shopping then most of the group had to be driven out to the airport for their trip home. Rolf and I stuck around for a little longer and I even visited some more caves in south Africa with my parents, but that’s for another report.

 

On my way to Yosemite

Posted in motorcycle, outdoors, Photography, Travel with tags , , , , , on July 12, 2014 by thecaptainnemo

Red Rock Road.

Red Rock Road. How’d they ever come up with that name?

Heading out from Susanville I had a fairly lengthy ride ahead of me so I decided to make a few stops to break it up. First up was a Short trip along red rock road, Next was a little site seeing going over the mountains through emigrant gap. a little chilly as there was still plenty of snow up there but the scenery was beautiful.

Snow covered peaks

Snow covered peaks

View from Emigrant Gap

View from Emigrant Gap

 

I then cut through the central valley and spotted a castle as I cruised along.

Castle

Castle

While I stopped to admire the castle some cows were checking me out.

Curious cows

Curious cows

As I headed on towards Yosemite it was getting dark so I pulled in at the Yosemite bug Hostel for the night. It was a busy night and there weren’t a lot of parking spaces open but I was able to squeeze my bike in by a telephone pole and check into a tent cabin for the night.

 

Yosemite Bug Hostel

Yosemite Bug Hostel

I love staying here, they have a great cafe with good food, a lounge where you can relax with other travelers by the fireplace and a full kitchen if you want to prepare your own food. Plus its only a short drive into Yosemite in the morning.

I arrived at the park to a long line of cars waiting to get in as it was a free park weekend but since I was on the bike they waved me on up to the front of the line and I cruised along to see the sites.

Yosemite Valley

Yosemite Valley

At one stop I saw a man trying to photograph his family so i offered to take a shot with all of them in it, in exchange he shot a couple of me!

riding in Yosemite

riding in Yosemite

Deer

Deer

Yosemite Falls

Yosemite Falls

Motorcycles

Motorcycles

On my way out of the park I parked behind a group of motorcycles, turned out they were a friendly group up from the bay area to enjoy a weekend cruise through the park.

I took my time driving through the mountain roads as I was in no hurry to return to the warm weather in the valley but I still made it to Selma for dinner time at the Spike and Rail and then I just had a straight cruise down 99 back to Bakersfield and home.

Spike and Rail  (formerly known as Split Pea Anderson s)

Spike and Rail (formerly known as Split Pea Anderson s)

 

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